Nosara

Look Where You Want To Go

“Look where you want to go and you’ll go there”.

Sounds easy, doesn’t it?  However, one of the most common surfing mistakes is not looking where you want to go on a wave.  This is especially important when taking off on faster waves.

If you’re finding that you often get left behind in the whitewash as each wave peels perfectly ahead of you, it is usually caused by two things…

1 > Looking at the bottom/trough of the wave as you paddle into the wave.

2 > Looking down at the board when you pop up.

If you look straight down towards the bottom of a wave (or even worse, at the board) when you first catch a wave, you will naturally go where you are looking. Which, in this case, is straight to the bottom of the wave where, if you then look across the wave, you’ll have the unfortunate view of watching the wave peel away without you as you flap around in the whitewash.

Does this sound like you?  Luckily, this is an easy fix.

If you want to go across the wave (down the line) in faster surf you have to make sure look where you want to go.   When you feel you’re about to catch the wave, look roughly 15ft or so down the line (across the wave) and high on the face – this is exactly where you want to go to make the first section and get some speed.   Then with your eyes still focused on your target spot, pop up as normal keep the high line and enjoy the ride.

Coaching Tip : If you’re finding it hard to not look at your board as you take off try practicing your pop ups alternating focusing your vision to your left and right on land (using the corners of a room works well) to get your body used to the new movement.  Often when people practice pop ups on land they are so preoccupied thinking about foot placement they constantly look down… a good habit to get out of as early as possible!

If you manage to consistently take off on waves looking where you want to go, you will automatically stay higher on the wave face right from the start which in turn will give you more speed and help you ride faster waves successfully!

If you feel like you are managing to look down the line on take off but you are still only going straight, you probably have a foot placement or weighting issue….more of that later.

 

 

 

 

 

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Don’t Be Afraid Of Your Backhand

Working as a surf guide can be funny sometimes. You find perfect surf and half the people are happy and the other half…not so much. It seems most people are so much happier surfing on their forehand (facing the wave) and not on their backhand (back to the wave). You take a goofy footer to a perfect right and they have fun, but are begging to go to a left the next time they surf and vice versa.

Granted, surfing on your backhand and forehand are almost like two different sports due to the shape of your body and the direction your knees bend. However I think this difference is one of the real joys of surfing and not something to have a preference on. I love the feeling of doing big gouges on my forehand as much as I enjoy a solid BH bottom turn to reo combo; both offer different sensations and challenges, but are equally enjoyable. You’re limiting yourself as a surfer if you insist on surfing in only one direction. So, what is holding you back from surfing your backhand?

Taj Burrow at Chopes, Notice the shoulders are parallel with the rails rather than pointing nose to tail. Photo by Kristen Prisk

The most common reason people find surfing on their backhand difficult is due to how they hold their leading arm/shoulder. You’ll see this quite often in the surf, someone straining to look over their shoulder at the wave, sticking their butt out to counterbalance their arms which are both pointing towards the beach…this could be you. Luckily this is a very easy fix as it just takes a small adjustment to your stance. Think about the stance surfers use for backhand barrels, very low to the board with the shoulders parallel with the rails of the board, left arm to the left and right arm to the right.

Having open shoulders makes it far easier to view the wave and put weight either on the inside or outside rail. Next time you surf try to catch a few waves on your backhand and think about opening up your shoulder and position your leading arm on the same side as the wave face rather than the opposite side with your trailing arm…surfing on your backhand should have just got a whole lot easier! If you are serious about utilizing your backhand some professional coaching can speed up the learning curve.

I’m natural footed, I love right-handers and I have been lucky enough to have surfed amazing waves on my forehand like Anchor Point, Kirra, Coxos, Lobos, Sultans, Shipwrecks and so on. But for all the world-class rights there is a whole plethora of amazing lefts that you could miss out on like Pipe, Uluwatu, Honkys, Frigates, Desert Point etc. and there’s no way I’d be standing on the beach just because I’d have to surf my backhand!

Don’t limit yourself to going in one direction (think Zoolander), get out there and challenge yourself, go surf on your backhand, open the leading shoulder, get good at it and the next time a perfect wave comes through and it’s on your backhand you will be excited rather than disappointed.

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Autopilot

Turning Off The Autopilot

For those of us that surf often we can be guilty of surfing on autopilot most of the time. What do I mean by autopilot? Essentially, going through the motions during a surf session. You’re surfing on autopilot when you only surf the waves that you are comfortable with, perform the same manoeuvres wave after wave, and do the same thing you always do when you surf.

Every lineup has a surfer that you have seen surfing the exact same way on each wave they ride. They never fall, but then they never do anything that amazing either. They are just doing what they always do, going through the motions.

So if you’re that surfer, is there really anything wrong with that? In theory, no. If you have been doing the same thing for years and you’re having fun then its all good, right? Sure, but at the same time you might be seeing other surfers in photos, on surf videos or even at your local break doing amazing manoeuvres and thinking “why can’t I do that?”. Maybe it’s just a new way to hit an end section, going a bit more vertical off the top, or maybe you just admire someone’s “cojones” for taking off deep on big waves.

It’s easy to fall into the trap of just repressing these thoughts and stick to what you know and keep surfing on autopilot for the rest of your session. Instead, try to dream big. For 20 minutes of every session get out of your comfort zone, try the new move that you have been dreaming of, take off deeper on a set wave, try hitting the lip a bit harder! And don’t worry if you fall off! In fact, be happy that you have – if you are falling, you have turned off the autopilot and you’re trying something new! And when trying something new, you’re bound to make some mistakes which will help you figure out how to improve. If you’re struggling to figure out a technique, it’s never to late to get some professional coaching ; ).

After 20 minutes of bravely facing the unknown, then its fine to go back to your regular routine, but if you can spend 20 minutes concentrating on a new skill you will soon see a big difference in your surfing (and surprise everyone at your local break!).

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…I’m On A Boat

Soon it will be time to go back to Waterworld.

In Nosara, Costa Rica where Pureline Surf is based, we are lucky enough to have a very long surf season that stretches from November right through to August.  But sadly, September and October are a bit of a write off.  The swell is still there, but endless days of rain and onshore winds make it pretty unappealing. And there’s also the little problem of flooded rivers, muddy roads, and lack of supplies to our little coastal town. By all accounts it is not somewhere you want to be unless you are a duck!  So rather than sit around in the rain and moan, we are headed back to the Maldives in mid-August for more tropical sunshine (just can’t get enough of it!) and some great reef break waves.

This will be my third season in the Maldives and I truly love the place.  It is the most picture postcard perfect place I have ever been!  With crystal clear water, beautiful marine life and palm fringed islands, what’s not to like?  When you factor in uncrowded (or usually completely empty!) world-class waves it’s an easy choice when looking for an escape from the rain!

We work with a fantastic company out there called Tropicsurf, which is hands down the best surf travel company I have ever worked with (trust me I have done the rounds). The brain child of Ross Phillips, a fantastic surfer, coach and surf pioneer, Tropicsurf  provides luxury surf adventures for all ages and abilities in a style that cannot be matched. They are industry leaders in coaching and luxury travel and run trips in Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, Maldives, Seychelles, Morocco, Fiji and more!

Three years ago, I took my maiden voyage in the Maldives on the Four Seasons Explorer (a 150ft luxury catamaran) as a Tropicsurf surf guide and it’s an experience I will never forget. Pairing the best guides and coaches in the world with a luxury catamaran in the most exotic place on earth is match made in heaven. The thing that has always impressed me most about Tropicsurf is their insatiable drive to get quality waves whatever it takes.  Twelve-hour overnight trips and chartering seaplanes is pretty standard with these guys. And all the while their guests are blissfully enjoying their fresh sashimi and lobster while sitting in the hot tub! Truly living the dream.

Tropicsurf is also stationed on land at two luxury resorts in the Maldives, The Four Seasons Kuda Huraa and Anantara Resort and Spa, I’m happy to say that I’ve had the pleasure of managing both of them. This year we will return (for the third time) to our favorite spot in the South Male Atoll, Anantara Resort and Spa. This fantastic 5 (and 6) star resort is spread across 5 small islands and just happens to be right next to some of the best surf in the Maldives that is suitable for all levels (even beginners). With a beautiful 50 foot surf boat at our disposal, we will be taking our lucky guests to the best surf in the south for a truly unforgettable once-in-a-lifetime-experience.

And after a few months in the Maldives, we will be back in Costa Rica in November to take advantage of the dry season and the amazing waves here.  Consider yourselves updated.

Only guy in there!

 South Male Atoll Surf Spots

 Nonya’s

A super fun right had reef break that is fun for all levels, Nonyas has two very distinct sections, a super mellow outside sections suitable for beginners that can link up with a super long rippable wall on the inside with the occasional tube.  A longboarders dream wave, but still fun on a chunky shortboard.

video

 Jacks

A bit of a secret spot off the corner of one of the islands, a short, shallow tubing left that is super fun once you get over the “shallow and sharp” part.

 Henry Reef

A fickle left across the channel from the resort, it has a long playful wall that accelerates as it goes down the line.

 Twin Peaks

Picks up the most swell in the South Male Atoll, a bit of a funky wave but always surfable.  Offers fun rights that grow in size along the reef.

 Boatyards

Named boatyards as it’s across the channel from a local boatyard (clever hey), but over the last few years the reef has shipwrecked a fair few vessels that got to close.  This is probably one of the best lefts in the Maldives, on it’s day it’s a world class left that drains down the reef for a really long way.

 Kandooma Right

I think this is the best wave in the Maldives, when it is on it’s full stand up barrel perfection….need I say more?

 Riptides

So ripable, it should be called skateparks,  when small it’s great for all levels, when it’s big…it just gets better!  There is a very defined channel so you can get out of harms way easily here at any size.  If you are lucky there could be some large Mantas feeding in the channel while you surf.  Great spot for a surf & snorkel trip.

Hospitals

Looks perfect…bites

 

 

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